Class of 2024 Admission Results – Updated w/ED 2

Class of 2024 Admission Results – Updated w/ED 2

Congrats to all of our seniors! This post includes results released at the end of January. ED 2 tends to be released in February; we will update this post or post a fresh list at that time.

Alabama*
American
Arizona State*
Bard*
Baylor
Boise State
Boston U
Bowdoin
Brooklyn College
Claremont McKenna
Clemson + Business*
College of Charleston*
Colorado College*
Cornell*
Drexel*
Duke
Elon*
Emory
Fairfield*
Fordham*
George Mason
Georgia Tech
Iowa
Indiana University + Kelley School of Business*
James Madison
Kenyon
Lehigh
Loyola MD*
Lynn
McGill*
Miami Ohio
Michigan State*
Montclair*
Northeastern*
Northwestern*
NYU*
Ohio State*
Ole Miss*
Penn State + Business and Engineering*
Providence College*
Purdue Engineering*
Richmond
Roger Williams
Rowan*
Santa Clara*
Seton Hall*
South Carolina*
SMU*
St. Andrews
St. John’s
Stevens Institute of Technology*
SUNY Binghamton*
SUNY New Paltz
SUNY Poly
TCU
Tulane*
University of Central Florida*
University of Colorado, Boulder + Engineering*
University of Delaware*
University of Denver
University of Georgia*
University of Illinois Urbana Champaign + Engineering*
University of Maryland + Business*
University of Massachusetts, Amherst*
University of Miami + Business*
University of Michigan*
University of Nevada
University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill
University of North Carolina, Wilmington
University of Oregon*
University of Pittsburgh*
University of Rhode Island*
University of Richmond*
University of South Carolina*
University of Southern California + Engineering*
University of Texas, Austin + Business*
University of Virginia*
University of Wisconsin + Engineering and Business*
Virginia Tech*
Wake Forest
WVU

*multiple students admitted

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College Rejections Aren’t Personal

College Rejections Aren’t Personal

I’m thankful that most of our students are admitted to their top choice schools in the EA, ED 1, or ED 2 rounds. But every year, some students are not so strategic with their choices and, therefore, are not as successful in these rounds. Each year since it was posted, I have revisited a wonderful article on rejection by Adam Grant. It begins by reminding us of what both students and parents can fast-forget when dealing with a college rejection:

When someone rejects you, it helps to remember that there’s another you.

You are not in this alone! A college with a 15% admit rate rejects 85% of applicants, so you’ve got a lot of company. Remember that you have to play to win, and when the game is over, the best thing you can do is move on confidently. 

As someone who has been rejected an appropriate amount, How to Bounce Back From Rejection is something I know well! Yet, it’s not something that can always be taught or that we can prepare students for, especially if a student is used to coming out on top. During a sea change year (i.e., this year and… honestly…the pathreet 3 years!) and when there is a lot of misinformation and misguidance around how hard it is to get into selective schools in the US, results can feel even more confusing. 

What Grants also points out that I hope all students and parents can keep in mind is rejection often happens for a reason that is not personal to the applicant: lack of fit. Fit is not all about where the student thinks they will be the best fit academically, culturally, etc. Fit is determined based on what a college needs (its institutional priorities)—it’s a moving target and not always a two-way street. Students don’t control, and in many cases don’t even know or understand, a college’s institutional priorities. How can they be when colleges are not transparent about it? What constitutes a fit in one applicant pool might not be a fit in another, and this can vary from school to school and year to year. 

Students, please remember: 

We are more than the bullet points on our resumes. We are better than the sentences we string together into a word salad under the magnifying glass of an interview. No one is rejecting us. They are rejecting a sample of our work, sometimes only after seeing it through a foggy lens.

Hang in there. In the end, as hard as it will feel to accept in the moment, things almost always work out just how they should.

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Students Admitted Early Decision as a Percentage of Enrolled Freshmen

Students Admitted Early Decision as a Percentage of Enrolled Freshmen

In 2022, Education Reform Now released the first brief in their Future of Fair Admissions series. The brief contained the most comprehensive research on college admissions early decision plans, which provide an applicant an admissions decision in mid-December in exchange for the student’s commitment to enroll if admitted. 

The chart linked below from ERN shows the 84 IHEs where a third or more of freshmen were enrolled through early decision (ED) programs in 2022 plus 6 more that enrolled more than a third of their freshmen ED in 2020 but did not share data for 2022. The Common Data Set does not publish the number of students who are enrolled through early decision. Since early decision is binding, you would expect a very high share of all students admitted ED to enroll. Blank spaces represent years when data were not available. 0% represents years an IHE did not offer ED.

You can review the chart here
 
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